GRENADA  |  Grenada Travel Guide
Saturday, December 16, 2017
images

Grenada

Destinations

Grenada, St. Vincent and the Grenadines belong to the Windward Islands in the Lesser Antilles chain of islands in the Caribbean Basin, forming the last hundred miles of the Windwards. Grenada and St. Vincent are decidedly mountainous, with deep valleys lush in tropical vegetation, and have rivers flowing to the sea. They are also volcanic in origin, showing either rims of ancient craters or having active volcanoes along their central spine. The Grenadines, on the other hand, lie on a volcanic ridge without tall mountains to trap cloud cover and produce rainfall. The Grenadines are dry, with drought-resistant vegetation.

Originally populated by the Ciboney Indians, followed by the Arawaks and then the Caribs, they were the final stronghold of the Carib Nation and thus the last to be settled by Europeans and assimilated into the plantation system, beginning in the 17th century. Today, they are the last stretch of the Caribbean to be absorbed by tourism.

Consequently, these islands tend to be more laid back, with fewer resorts and developed areas for shopping or dining. Instead, you discover small boutiques, cafés and family-run inns and guesthouses, many owned by West Indians. Recently, foreign-owned corporations have begun building upscale resorts comparable in price and luxury with those on islands to the north. Size has been downscaled, allowing them to be more secluded for high-profile or high-stress clients.

The people of these two nations are a lovely mixture of Scottish, African, English, French, Portuguese, Indian and Carib. Historically, the reference to “coloureds” is a colonial term for any mixing of whites with Africans or Caribs. In colonial days, a man born in the Caribbean could be of pure English blood but was described as a mulatto and considered inferior. Today, while the connotations are no longer the same, locals still refer to three distinctive types of islanders: black, white and “coloured.” There are other qualifications of this, as some coloured people can be “red” and others can be “clear.”

The common language is English, although what you’ll hear is far from the King’s English. With the distinctive West Indian accent, many words in everyday use are drawn from the mixed heritage. Local patois differs from island to island and unless you are a frequent visitor or have an ear for languages, it can be difficult to decipher. Papayas are pawpaws, “when did you arrive on the island?” is when you reach? To be angry is to be vex. In Grenada, taches are large cauldrons used to boil up sugar; in St. Vincent they are called coppers. Vay-ki-vay is omething disorderly or careless. Someone from St. Vincent is a Vincy. Liming is just hanging around. Mash up is self-explanatory, as in “Me get so vex wid she, she mash up me car.”

 

Destinations in Grenada (2)

  • Grenada

    Grenada is universally referred to as the “Spice Island.” Once you’ve walked through the interior, seen the Market Square or eaten at any of the delectable restaurants, you’ll find this reputation rings true. Nutmeg reigns, cocoa...

    Read More
  • Nutmeg in Grenada

    It is impossible to go to Grenada and avoid the nutmeg. The spice is sprinkled on your rum punch, mixed in sauces, an ingredient of pastries and the tree grows profusely throughout the island. Mysristica fragrans is the botanical name of this...

    Read More

PhotoImpression

What's New?

New and Updated Travel Guides

  • Cuzco is the ancient capital of the Inca Empire, and the epicenter of the Andean Quechua culture. It has a monumental... Read More

  • Thimphu is the seat of the last of the Himalayan kingdoms. It sits in splendid isolation in a long, high valley in the... Read More

  • Mostar is where Christians converted to Islam, and where moussaka – consisting of sliced eggplants sautéed in... Read More

  • Santiago is Chile's capital of cool. It's mostly a modern metropolis, but with more than 500 years of history and relics... Read More

  • Tampere is a city of rock. In fact, Tampere, Finland, like Manchester, England, evolved from a market town into a major... Read More

Trending Themes:

Guides to Popular Ski Resorts

  • Ischgl is a small mountain village turned hip ski resort, with massive appeal among the party-hearty young crowds. It is... Read More

  • Andorra la Vella is its own little world, and not just because it’s a 290-square-mile independent principality (a fifth the... Read More

  • Bariloche (officially San Carlos de Bariloche) is the place to be seen. It is to Argentina what Aspen is to the... Read More

  • Aspen is America's most famous ski resort. And that's an understatement. For, as a ski complex, Aspen is unsurpassed. Its... Read More

  • Zermatt is a small but glamorous mountain resort town, with a population of approximately 5,700. It is one of Switzerland's... Read More

  • St. Moritz is a glitzy, alpine resort town in the celebrated Engadin Valley of Switzerland, with huge notoriety as the... Read More

  • Lake Tahoe is the premier lake resort of America, and the largest alpine lake in all of North America. It is an absolutely... Read More

  • St. Anton, Sankt Anton am Arlberg in German, is Austria's premier ski-bum resort! It's actually a small village cum... Read More

  • Kitzbühel, a small, Tyrolian resort town in the Kitzbüheler Alps, comes with international renown and huge snob appeal, and... Read More

 

Copyright © 2010-2013 Indian Chief Travel Guides. Images tagged as (cc) are licensed under the Creative Commons CC-BY-SA license.