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Maui, Hawaii

Fleming Beach, Kapalua, Maui, Hawaii (cc)
 

Maui

Maui is an incredible draw, and always has been. But the throngs of visitors have hardly dampened its appeal. In fact, the word from the islands is that Maui is "no ka oi!" ("the best")! Island residents and visitors alike will tell you that Maui has some of Hawaii's best beaches, best resorts, best golf courses, the best weather, with an average of 320 days of sunshine a year, and the sweetest pineapples on the face of the planet! And it's all true.


The Islands of Hawaii


Maui Orientation

Alternately known as the “Valley Isle” and the "Magic Island," Maui is the second largest of the Hawaiian islands, encompassing 729 square miles. It comprises two distinct, volcanic land masses, West Maui and East Maui, joined together by a low central valley (or isthmus). West Maui, the smaller and drier of the two, owes its existence to the extinct Pu'u Kukui volcano, elevation, 5,788 feet, and boasts the island's premier resorts, Ka'anapali and Kapalua, and also the historic, tourist-alluring town of Lahaina. East Maui, larger and more varied, is home to Maui's principal towns, Kahului and Wailuku, and towering Mount Haleakala, elevation 10,023 feet (the highest point on Maui), the mid to lower reaches of which make up Upcountry, the fertile cradle of Maui's agriculture. East Maui also includes the southwest coast of the island where Kihei, Wailea and Makena spill over onto sandy, sun-drenched beaches, as well as the rain-soaked, lush countryside along the Road to Hana at the southeastern end of the island.

Maui has a population of more than 85,000, and is one of the most popular destinations in Hawaii, drawing more than 2.5 million visitors annually. It has no fewer than 13,000 hotel rooms and rental condominium accommodations, more than 200 restaurants, and a wealth of recreational opportunities, including swimming, snorkeling, scuba diving, windsurfing, sailing, whale-watching, hiking, biking, horseback riding, golfing, and beachcombing.

The island lies approximately 35 miles northwest of the Big Island of Hawaii, with Molokai and Lanai to its north and west, respectively, each some 9 miles distant. The island of Oahu lies 75 miles to the northwest of Maui.

Last updated November 12, 2013
Posted in   United States  |  Maui
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