GERMANY  |  Lahn Valley, Germany Travel Guide
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Fulda

Statue of St, Boniface in Fulda, Germany (cc)
 

Fulda Travel Guide

Introduction

Fulda is a small town in the mountains northeast of Hesse that has two major draws: its elegant Baroque churches and palaces, and its religious core that dates back many centuries. The town is actually tied to the legacy of the Anglo-Saxon monk Winfrid, better known as St. Boniface, who converted much of Hesse and what is now Thuringia to Christianity, and was a major force in strengthening the church in Germany. In 744, Boniface founded a monastery in Fulda, and in 754, upon his death, he was buried here. The town, and more specifically Boniface's grave, has been a place of pilgrimage since. As for the Baroque buildings, they date largely from the early 18th century when the town's center was rebuilt, and remain a magnet for visitors.

Location

Fulda is located 44 miles (70 km) southeast of Marburg, or 59 miles (95 km) northeast of Frankfurt in the German state of Hesse.

How to Get There

Sightseeing

Fulda's principal attractions include the Fulda Dom, a picturesque Baroque cathedral where you can also see the tomb of St. Boniface; the Fulda Dommuseum which houses the reliquary containing the head and codex of St. Boniface, as well as an interesting collection of paintings that include works by Lucas Cranach and Johann Tischbein; the Baroque Stadtschloss/Residenz, built by the prince-abbots between 1706 and 1721, which has on display a rare collection of 18th-century Thuringian and Fulda porcelain; Michaelskirche, also Baroque, with its Carolingian crypt dating from 819; Kloster Frauenberg, a Franciscan monastery; and the Schlossgarten, which was originally Baroque but converted to the English landscape style that you see today, most recently laid out in the 19th century. In addition, there's a small collection of interesting buildings in assorted architectural styles that includes the Gothic St. Severikirche, the red-and-white St. Blasiuskirche, and the 16th-century, half-timbered Rathaus (Town Hall), embellished with interesting little towers. There's also an old university in Fulda, established in 1734.

Main Neighborhoods

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How to Get Around

Where to Party

Where to Eat

Where to Stay

Know Before You Go

  • Best Time to Visit:
  • Cost Per Day: US$-US$ (-)
  • Currency: (US$1 ~ )
  • Electricity: 220-240V - 50Hz
  • Phone Code: +49
  • Population: 65,000
  • Official Website:

Nearby Destinations

© Indian Chief Travel Guides

Last updated December 1, 2013
Posted in   Germany  |  Lahn Valley
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